SAMOA – Scalable Advanced Massive Online Analysis

In this post, I’ll give a quick overview of upcoming distributed streaming machine learning framework,  Scalable Advanced Massive Online Analysis (SAMOA). As I  mentioned before, SAMOA is part of my and Antonio’s theses with Yahoo! Labs Barcelona.

What is SAMOA?

SAMOA is a tool to perform mining on big data streams. It is a distributed streaming machine learning  (ML) framework, i.e. it is a Mahout but for stream mining. SAMOA contains a programing abstraction for distributed streaming ML algorithms (refer to this post for stream ML definition) to enable development of new ML algorithms without dealing with the complexity of underlying streaming processing engines (SPE, such as Twitter Storm and S4).  SAMOA also provides extensibility in integrating new SPEs into the framework. These features allow SAMOA users to develop distributed streaming ML algorithms once and they can execute the algorithms in multiple SPEs, i.e. code the algorithms once and execute them in multiple SPEs.

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Parallelism for Distributed Streaming ML


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In this post, we will revisit several parallelism types that can be applied to modify conventional streaming (or online) machine learning algorithms into distributed and parallel ones. This post is a quick summary of half of chapter 4 of my thesis (which I completed one month ago! yay!).

Data Parallelism

Data Parallelism parallelize and distribute the algorithms based on the data. There are two types of data parallelism, they are Vertical Parallelism and Horizontal Parallelism.

Horizontal Parallelism

Horizontal parallelism splits the data based on the quantity of the data i.e. same amount of data subset goes into the parallel computation. If let’s say we have 4 components that perform parallel computation, and we have 100 data, then each component computes 25 data. As shown in figure below, each parallel component has local machine learning (ML) model. Every parallel component then performs periodical update into the global ML model. Horizontal Parallelism

This type of parallelism is often used to provide horizontal scalability. In online learning context, horizontal parallelism is suitable when the data arrival rate is very high. However, horizontal parallelism needs high number of memory since it needs to replicate the online machine learning model in every parallel computation element. Another caveat for horizontal parallelism is the additional complexity that introduced when propagating the model updates between parallel computation element. Example of horizontal parallelism in distributed streaming machine learning algorithm is Ben-Haim and Yom-Tov’s work about streaming parallel decision tree algorithm.

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Distributed Streaming Classification: Related Work

In this post, I plan to write some quick recap of related works in Distributed Streaming Classification, focusing on decision tree induction. It is still related to my thesis in Distributed Streaming Machine Learning Framework. I divide this post into four sections: Classification, Distributed Classification, Streaming Classification, and Distributed Streaming Classification. Without further ado, let’s start with Classification

Classification

Classification is a type machine learning task which infers a function from labeled training data. This function is used to predict the label (or class) of testing data. Classification is also called as supervised learning since we use the actual class output (the ground truth) to supervise the output of our classification algorithm. Many classification algorithms have been developed such as tree-based algorithms (C4.5 decision tree, bagging and boosting decision tree, decision stump, boosted stump, random forest etc), neural-network, Support Vector Machine (SVMs), rule-based algorithms(conjunctive rule, RIPPER, PART, PRISM etc), naive bayes, logistic regression and many more.

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